1. What is the VanPlan.org project?

A project to develop a mobile assessment package of noninvasive technical methodologies, tools and devices to evaluate individual, group, neighborhood and community health and well-being.

2. Why is this project needed?

We cannot rely on the talking heads of the media or the incredibly tricky public polling process to tell us how we should feel and what we should believe. This project helps us find out who we really are!

3. What is noninvasive sensory technology?

These are highly sensitive technologies designed to work through close approximation or immediate contact with the human body but do not require implantation or any kind of human invasive penetration for the device to operate properly.

4. What are some examples of technologies and devices to be used in this project?

This is one of the examples of questions we can answer in this project. Who really knows how many different systems are currently on the shelf or under development for optical, chemical, magnetic and endless other sensory technologies that can be integrated to help us find out who we really are!

5. What kind of Van is involved?

The van envisioned in this project is the classic trailer van that is common on the roadways across America.  It would be large enough to conduct multiple assessments simultaneously for her. At one location and then be moved to another location for an entirely different set of assessments.

 

6. What will this Van contain?

There will be numerous individual pods that can be integrated for larger group sessions. The van will be constructed to allow different modules of different kinds of assessment tools to be utilized in different patterns to explore various different situations. This Van will allow for localized assessments and also be equipped for extending specialized Internet services in each individual area prior to the vehicle moving on to its next assessment assignment.

7. Will this just be a one time, one place experience and will there be lasting benefits from this effort?

It is hoped that with this initial localized resource and the increasing power of the Internet each location will be able to revitalize and rebuild the dilapidated Public Health system that exist today in the United States.

8. Why is this ||Assessment Phase|| the first target?

It is necessary that we first developed the tools and techniques to properly establish who we are before we can legitimately begin to improve the health and happiness of ourselves and our communities.

9. Why don't we just start with the ||Intervention Phase||?

A classic example of this paradox is the current situation related to guns and violence in this country. We have politicians telling us numerous things we should think, we have gun dealers and associations of gunowners telling us what we should think, and we have endless media pundits telling us how to think but I believe we first must find out who we really are?

10. What issues will the Assessment Phase be evaluating?

One of the most powerful features of this project is the technical foundation will allow for one session in one community to focus on the assessment of violence in adults and something entirely different in the next assessment session and/or the next community. The van will be continually updated with the latest tools and technologies for each type of assessment on a real-time basis as issues, public policy or technology changes.

 

11. What are the needs and components of this project?

Initially we need people to feel and demonstrate their passion and contact us to find the best way to put that to use!

12. What is the estimated cost for this first assessment Van?

It is way too early in this project to do the necessary work.  We are establishing a $25,000 Kickstarter crowdsourcing program to do the research necessary to answer that question and begin the necessary fundraising.

13. What is the projected future for this assessment phase?

We are confident that if we should find sufficient money through angel funding, venture-capital or any other legal method we could get this project up and operating in a community near you within six months!

14. How will this Assessment Phase progress into an Intervention Phase?

Sadly, this depends almost exclusively on the funding for this project.  With proper funding we could begin initiating preliminary intervention options to the professionals and laypeople in the community very quickly. Which could be very important for something like violence or immigration in some communities.

15. What are some of the objectives for this initial phase of the project?

We need to begin bringing writers, video game developers and technologists together in a network to begin charting the many pathways to finding out who we are.

NCR 500_pre_van_1969
The History of the VanPlan

By Dr. David Udy

I was definitely a below average student in high school. Mostly D and D- with an occasional C.  that was very difficult for my parents to understand and was even more perplexing to me because I couldn’t wait to get home from school and start reading my ever-growing collection of science fiction authors. It was during Christmas session that I decided on the final classes before I graduated.

Among the easiest classes I could think of was a Beginning Business class being offered by a new teacher at Boise High School.  Taking that class turned out to be one of the smartest things I’ve ever done and the teacher became a great mentor for me both personally and professionally.

This was the actual beginning of what turned out to be the VanPlan.

As the school year was concluding for me I made the decision that I was going to go into the military even though it was at the height of the Vietnam War I was a very tough and very young man so I went down alone and signed the papers to join the U.S. Army for a period of three years so I didn’t have to do a shorter tour which would ensure that I would be a rifleman.  Because I took the additional year, I could select my own area of training and service. Since my father had let the work at the Sears warehouse in Boise I selected a new classification to become a Stock Control and Accounting Specialist because I knew where houses would be involved and not directly fighting the enemy.

In the final semester of my business class I was on track for and A simply because of the inspiration and help of Mr. Bell. This was particularly ironic to me because I had already decided my own future and at the conference with the schools Guidance Counselor I was told I had no future in further schooling so I should consider a vocational school where I could learn a trade.

As a result of my excellent academic work in my business class I became elected as the Idaho State Vice President for the Idaho chapter of the Distributive Education Clubs of America (DECA). As a result of that honor me and several other DECA officers in our class were invited down to the local newspaper to get our pictures taken examining their brand-new NCR 500 computer they had just purchased to manage some of their enrollment and business activities at the newspaper. I had no way of knowing it at the time but this NCR 500 computer would be the main thing in my life when I got to Vietnam, shortly.

My first introduction to the VanPlan.NCR 500 van

Other than my commitment for one extra year of my time to get into logistics rather than fighting, there were no other commitments when I began my basic training at Fort Ord California. I was not really worried about basic training and as a 17-year-old boy I simply had no idea what to expect. Part of the way through basic training there were reportedly 40,000 trainees going through our program at that time. Each of us was given a number of different psychometric exams and various other testing platforms over two days. When we graduated from basic training everyone in our unit was immediately sent to Vietnam. Me and 39 other rather odd people were pulled out and sent to a top security compound in Fort Lee Virginia. Understand this was 40 individuals out of 40,000 so we were definitely a unique group. To make this clear to everyone in the Army we were given a special Military Occupational Speciality (MOS) number that no one else in the military understood because we were to be the first group deployed to actually take large mainframe computers into an active war zone. This was June 1969 because I had actually signed up in March of that year so I was really on a bullet train.

Other than my commitment for one extra year of my time to get into logistics rather than fighting, there were no other commitments when I began my basic training at Fort Ord California. I was not really worried about basic training and as a 17-year-old boy I simply had no idea what to expect. Part of the way through basic training there were reportedly 40,000 trainees going through our program at that time. Each of us was given a number of different psychometric exams and various other testing platforms over two days. When we graduated from basic training everyone in our unit was immediately sent to Vietnam. Me and 39 other rather odd people were pulled out and sent to a top security compound in Fort Lee Virginia. Understand this was 40 individuals out of 40,000 so we were definitely a unique group. To make this clear to everyone in the Army we were given a special

When we arrived at Fort Lee Virginia we relocated in a highly secure area and we began classroom training the day after our arrival on the basic idea of moving computers closer to the war zone to facilitate and expedite the movement of all logistics in a particular regional area. We were all quite young and I was the youngest at only 17. Fortunately all of the time I had spent working for and watching my father deal with customers and his own staff I was well beyond my young age and the fact that I had had so much experience working in warehouses actually elevated me quite quickly.

After about a week of classroom training, including several orientations on the NCR 500 computer system which I did not recognize from the short time I had seen it at the Boise newspaper, we were assembled and marched to an area even more secure than our barracks and when we got through the gate I could see maybe 10 to 12 large cargo vans like I had seen and unloaded many times while working at the Sears warehouse in Boise. This didn’t seem unusual to me since I was still involved in logistics even though it was now computerize logistics. Then when we actually got inside the van I saw that it was really an installation with a large NCR 500 computer and a card sorter and several keypunch machines.

I didn’t realize until I saw a picture of me at the Boise newspaper that I was actually sitting in front of the NCR 500 computer I would manage only a few short months later in Vietnam.  Big Job for a 17-year-old boy. I didn’t realize it at the time but computers really are a young man’s game and because of it our computer installation was run by our very odd group and generally ignored by everyone else.

When I actually got to Vietnam I began showing my orders to every officer I could find but since the six of us that were together at that time all I had unique MOS numbers nobody could tell us where to go. After three days I found a master sergeant that told me I needed to go to Camp Eagle to hook up with my unit. I was so excited to get into the game and I couldn’t get assigned a weapon or any real sleeping place I left the area and headed north to find Camp Eagle. After three weeks of literally hitchhiking up through the center of Vietnam I stopped at a place near the DMZ and they told me camp Eagle was just over the hill but that it had been hit by a recent rocket attack from the North Vietnamese. When I made it to the hilltop and look down on what had been Camp Eagle there were only some black spots were something had been and essentially nothing had been left standing.

Fortunately I found some guys that were cleaning up the mess and they told me I needed to move even further north to a place called Chu Lai. I would spend the next four months working with the military VanPlan!

From the very beginning I was fascinated by the power and the concept of having computers inside of large tractor-trailer vehicles. While working with my father at the Sears warehouse in Boise I had loaded and unloaded hundreds of these vans but these systems containing digital power was something very few people had even dreamed of at that time.

About four months into my tour in Vietnam I had more inspiration when we were told that our unit would be moved to an area away from the DMZ in northern Vietnam. After spending about a week getting everything organized we were told that we would be moving to a nearby mountaintop to improve our security. The next day we were packing everything up when our first sergeant told us to look at a certain mountain in our area around 2 o’clock in the afternoon. During that period I saw a typical B-52 run over the mountaintop. Suddenly there was a tremendous explosion on the mountain and when the dust cleared the top of the mountain was gone!

I learned later that they had used a relatively new so-called Daisy Cutter bomb to level the top of the mountain. Unlike other explosive ordinance this particular bomb was designed in a way to not leave the traditional bomb craters but rather this Daisy Cutter would absolutely flatten the area of its explosion to leave a dirt parking lot when it was done.

The following day I had another very enlightening experience regarding the VanPlan when numerous helicopters arrived in our area and they begin to fasten our computer vans to these massive heavy-duty helicopters that simply picked them up and began moving to the flattened mountaintop nearby. Shortly another helicopter picked all of us up and flew us to the top of the mountain where our vans had just arrived. Prior to getting there a great many Marines began fortifying the area and digging bunkers for our arrival.

Suddenly we were running around connecting several large newly arrived power generators into our vans and within hours we were beginning to energize all of the equipment.  I found this particularly remarkable because we were now on top of the mountain with no roads leading into or out of our camp. The following day we could see a group of military road builders start to carve their way through the jungle to get up to our mountaintop retreat. Shortly after the roads arrived we had numerous big rigs roll into our parking lot and begin the major expansion of the logistics in that area. This was a fascinating experience for me because I had spent a number of days with my father in the woods of cascade Idaho watching helicopters do logging by moving giant trees as simply as these fellows moved our vans.

Part of my PTSD is from seeing the incredible damage that are single computer was able to generate through the distribution of weapons and bombs! With so much damage just think of all the good that we could to with the refocus on helping not hurting people!

When I left the military in 1971 I decided that I was going to keep this VanPlan in my mind as I began my academic career at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. The miniaturization of digital electronics was having a tremendous effect during that period and I began to envision multiple computers inside of a single van.

During my early academic career I became fascinated with public health and began thinking about a new approach that I was calling Mobile Medical with the idea of taking many traditionally hospital bound technologies integrated into a single van that could move around disadvantaged communities and improve their health.

I had a “Clarifying” moment during the Rodney King riots in Los Angeles. I was working on my doctorate in public health at the time and I did some initial documentation on how the exploding personal computer industry could be a perfect example for this VanPlan project and some of the distressed areas of Los Angeles. Unfortunately I had to put most of my effort into the completion of my doctorate degree so this VanPlan project has remained dormant for a number of years.

With the ongoing 2016 political season it became clear to me that the constant use of polling mechanisms and in ineffectual media and the countries terrible education system I needed to regenerate this VanPlan project. It is impossible for us to move forward until we legitimately find out who we are and how we feel!

With the tremendous improvement in noninvasive sensor technologies and the tremendous improvement in gameplaying and other technologies I believe this revival of this age old VanPlan project is the ideal answer for the major problems of our day!

 

 

sml_van planVanPlan.org Introduction

The objective of this effort is to generate passion and stimulate research in an effort to develop a mobile assessment package of noninvasive technical methodologies, tools and devices to evaluate individual, group, neighborhood and community health and well-being.

This first stage of any Public Health intervention is the assessment phase to determine the current condition of anyone from a single individual to communities anywhere on the planet.

It is believed that with the variety of cultural problems we are all facing we must investigate this technical assessment approach that will be scalable, flexible and adaptable to any assessment issues or cultural problems we may face in the future.

The outcome of this scientific assessment phase will inevitably uncover numerous potential pathways for interventions that can be rigorously evaluated which will inevitably lead to many positive outcomes for the community in general.

 

sml_van planAssessment Issues

Examples of some issues to be evaluated with this project.

  • Violence
  • Poverty
  • Injustice
  • Human Rights
  • Climate Change
  • Religion
  • Education
  • Politics
  • Community Issues
  • International Issues

How would the Assessment Phase proceed in the future

  1. Develop a comprehensive dynamic list of all potential issues
  2. Organize and prioritize the list
  3. Develop assessment tools and instruments
  4. Stratify tools and instruments for different age groups and sexes
  5. Began administering assessments locally and archiving results
  6. Develop different assessments in different communities and archive results
  7. Refine and re-administer periodically and archive results
  8. Produce periodic reports directed at improving assessments and building intervention systems
  9. Produce reports and mobilize a multidirectional fundraising process

Are we going to keep believing the Talking Heads & Poling data to find out how we feel about violence?

If the data is true shouldn’t we study how we feel and what we are to do about it?

Isn’t this important anymore?  Shame on all of us

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